Posted by: Dr Pano Kroko Churchill | December 25, 2014

Dr Kroko Talk in Mexico City for Peace and Reconciliation — Shame on Mexico

Dr Kroko gave a stirring Talk in Mexico City for Peace and Reconciliation yesterday, and this was a small gesture in the service of Peace and Human Rights.

But it was also a powerful gesture and part of a larger effort at reaching out to the disenfranchised Human Rights Community of Mexico, the anti-corruption activists, and those leading voice seeking to establish the basis of a dialogue with the federal government — all in order to reach a national consensus for the eradication of Corruption in Mexico.

Dr Kroko’s talk came at the end of a day full of gatherings and discussions of the future of Mexico and it was a humble Christmas gift from the heart, to the hurt people of Mexico. Dr Pano Kroko spoke to those honest people of Mexico caught between a corrupt government and a criminally corrupt bureaucracy, while trying to weave a decent Life out of the ashes of their burned out Democracy.

Dr Kroko came to be invited to deliver our knowledge and the famous anti-corruption method of Dr Kroko’s work, through community organizing, through talks, through the sense of shared responsibility and through our shared work in our Anti-Corruption mission, and through our work towards transparency and accountability around the world.

We came here in Mexico City amid secrecy because we had many threats and wanted to ensure our safety and the capacity of our hosts to feel safe and act bravely in the face of evil. Still Dr Kroko was unfazed by the death threats and confirmed violence of the state target against him, and against our people, and came to see, speak, and share, with the people of Mexico all of his soulful Spirit and encouraging words. But above all else Dr Kroko came to share his work…

Dr Kroko’s Human Rights work stems from way back in his South Africa anti-Apartheid struggle, to today’s struggle against the massive corruption in Mexico and Greece, Dr Kroko’s fight against the Ministerial Corruption in Greece has led to his expulsion from the country but it has sped the dial forward on Human Rights and Progress for the people of Greece. The same is true for South Africa where he had worked together with Nelson Mandela and Desmond Tutu to fight and change the Economic impoverishment of Africa due to runaway corruption. So today this fight in Mexico is all part and  parcel of his efforts to cure the same human sickness ravaging people’s lives across the world: Greed.

And here in Mexico City, Dr Kroko spoke magnificently against the greed and corruption of the federal and local governments of Mexico. He spoke long and strong, of the need to create institutions, processes, and Human Rights watchdog organizations, in order to ensure that massive Human Rights crimes like what just happened in Guerrero — never happen again. He spoke of the fact that if Mexico cleans up it’s act, their citizens will not have to migrate illegally to the United States, so just to earn their meagre livelihood. He spoke of the power of Democracy to unseat corruption and clean up the country. He spoke of the need to make amends with the past and reconcile the warring tribes, and he spoke of the urgent need to  seek Truth and Justice today.

And Dr Kroko spoke of the massive deficit of Love in Mexico today.

He spoke of the massive deficit of Love the people of Mexico are feeling right now.

And Dr Kroko spoke of the Love needed to forgive and reconcile.

And lastly he spoke of the healing power of Love and of how this most difficult of all human feelings is the basis of our future co-existence.

Dr Kroko said that Love and Forgiveness are the only things standing between us coexisting in a peaceful Democracy ruled by the righteous letter of the Law and Mass Murder.

Dr Kroko spoke in front of a packed house in the central Theatre of  Mexico City’s civil administration quarter, and stirred the hearts and minds of the participants with his call for Peace and Reconciliation.

Almost a thousand people came to participate in this event that the Occupy Mexico City folk had organized along with Solidarity organizations and the Human Rights groups of Mexico.

Dr Kroko stressed that Transparency, Truth, and Admission of culpability by those in power is the first step towards a positive resolution of this crisis.

Dr Kroko spoke for a full three hours on the subject of Human Rights and the constant vigilance and battle required to rid the country of the burden of corruption.

Dr Pano Kroko spoke of the specific case of the Corruption that led to the certain execution style death of the 43 student teachers and the many similar cases of this magnitude taking place in the state of Mexico.

Dr Kroko uncovered the fact that Mexican federal authorities had real-time information of the attacks on the group of student teachers by corrupt local police, and the local criminal gangs, but did nothing to stop the disappearance and massacre of the 43 human right demonstrating people.

He said that this new evidence has been uncovered by the FBI from the United states that got involved in the heinous crime over the course of last week, and some of it’s findings were also published by the news magazine “Proceso” as a rebuttal to the Mexican President’s allegation that the Federal Police knew nothing of the heinous crime as it unfolded.

Dr Kroko said that now we know better, because based on leaked government documents, the Federal Executives were heavily involved in this massacre, and this is rightfully going to fuel public anger at the government of the president, Enrique Peña Nieto, which has insisted that federal authorities share no responsibility for the students’ disappearance.

And Dr Kroko said that so far, only 79 people have been arrested over the presumed massacre of the 43 student/teachers, on 26 September — when we all know that the network of corruption and criminality that made this mass murder possible — involves several thousand people at all level of the government and bureaucracy.

Also Dr Kroko said that unfortunately all arrested criminals are really low level public officials allegedly linked to a network of corrupt local politicians, and police officers, in the southern city of Iguala in the state of Guerrero, or members of a drug gang called Guerreros Unidos  — but not even one person of higher rank.

Dr Kroko spoke of the heartache that he felt for the parents of the missing students who have long alleged that federal Police and other federal law enforcement institutions had not only known what was happening but had participated in the massacre themselves.

Dr Kroko spoke against the apathy of the federal police and attacked them for not intervening to stop the massacre.

Dr Kroko spoke of the growing scepticism over the governmental accounts of the massacre – and the chocking frustration with the haphazard federal response which has propelled a string of actions, protests, demos, and speeches like this one, against the Mexican government in recent weeks.

Dr Kroko spoke that the early FBI investigation discoveries shared with the Proceso magazine, are based on existing documents from an initial state-level investigation which was curtailed when the Mexican federal authorities took over the “case” in early October.

Dr Pano Kroko said that the now leaked documents included a detailed record of the student’s movements made by a government information command post – known as a C4 – as the group left their college in Ayotzinapa in the town of Tixtla. They were travelling by bus to Iguala, about two hours’ drive away, intending to commandeer more buses from the city to use in a later protest. Customarily, the C4 (Control, Command, Communications and Computation) posts are run by state governments, but are charged with collecting and distributing information to all local and federal law enforcement agencies within a particular area.

According to the leaked documents account, as presented by the FBI and as released by the Proceso magazine investigation — the C4 informed the head of the federal police unit stationed in Iguala when the students arrived at the city’s bus station at 9.22pm. About 20 minutes later, the C4 reported that gunfire had broken out – the opening volleys of what turned into several hours of violence…

Dr Kroko referred to Anabel Hernández, one of the Proceso magazine report’s authors who had this to say about the Guerrero mass murders: “When we see that the federal government and the state government were following the students since they left the college in Ayotzinapa, it becomes very difficult to think that everything else that happened was an accident.”

Dr Kroko said that the most contentious claim in the leaked documents story was that the Mexican federal forces, had participated in the attack against the unarmed students and human rights demonstrators.

Dr Pano Kroko said that this position has been taken up by the survivors of the attack against the activists in Iguala/Guerrero.

Enrique Galindo, the head of the federal police, said there is no evidence that federal officers had participated in the events of the 26 September inside Iguala. But Galindo admitted that the 16 federal police officers stationed in the city were aware of the students’ movements as they approached Iguala. “We knew, of course, because they were in buses and they were travelling on federal highways. That seems to me to be normal. It would be worse not to know,” Galindo said in an interview on the Televisa TV network. “We did not participate inside the city.”

The report also questions the official version that Iguala’s mayor, José Luis Abarca, ordered the attacks for fear the students would disrupt an event to promote his wife María de los Angeles Pineda’s political ambitions.

According to the released information by the magazine Proceso, the event finished at 8pm – more than an hour before the students reached the town of Iguala.

Proceso’s investigative revelations came just days after a group of scientists from the National Autonomous University of Mexico raised further questions over the official version of events, and the “official version” of events came to be unsupportable now through the FBI’s involvement investigating the heinous mass murder case of the unarmed human rights protesters.

Still the Mexican attorney general, Jesús Murillo, insists the Federal Police had no involvement in the massacre and he says the students were detained by municipal police and then handed over to the “Guerreros Unidos” drug cartel gang, who killed them at a municipal rubbish dump site, before burning the bodies. Such was the intensity of the bone fire, Murillo said, that the bodies were reduced to mere ashes and bone fragments.

In their report last week, the scientists said that evidence from the supposed crime scene did not support the theory of a mass crime covering fire.

The report by the scientists, released on 11 December, said that the fire would have required 33 tons of logs, or nearly 1,000 tyres, to reduce 43 bodies to the remains presented as evidence by the attorney general. If tyres had been used, they said, this would also have left behind considerable amounts of metal.

Popular fury over the massacre – and recurring allegations of state involvement – have helped bring hundreds of thousands of protesters to a string of anti-government demonstrations over recent weeks.

About 21 people were hurt, including students, parents of missing students and federal police officers, after serious clashes broke out during a protest in Chilpancingo on Sunday and many more.

Dr Kroko was instrumental in the European Union’s Resolution against Mexico for it’s horrible Human Rights Record and the Violations of the basic Right to Life as agreed upon.

Dr Kroko and the Greens in the EFA Coalition of the European Union had brought up this as a Draft Resolution to the European Parliament in order to rescind the favourite trading nation status of Mexico in regards to the European Union.

And in his talk yesterday Dr Kroko reminded the people of Mexico City that his form of “Economic Embargo” coming from the EUropean Union does not hurt the people — but rather punishes the corrupt federal and state governments, in order to steer them to the right course, and thus strengthens the Civil Rights of the people of Mexico…

Much like Dr Kroko’s anti-corruption organization supported the economic sanctions against the government of Apartheid of South Africa back in the late 80’s — today the emphasis is on corrupt governments like Mexico and Greece.

Yours,

Pano

PS:

Feliz Navidad

We use economic sanctions in order to guide them to clean up their act. You would be surprised how quickly this type of sanctions work against the criminal regimes ruling fallen democracies in countries like Greece and Mexico.

And the European Parliament is a strong lever for this type of activity to be channeled into action.

So here is the resolution we sponsored and was duly adopted by the European Parliament against the State of Mexico:

European Union Response to the Abduction and Murder of the 43 student teachers in Guerrero/Mexico is to remove favourite nation trading status

Greens/EFA motion for resolution

Tabled by Ernest Urtasun, Josep-Maria Terricabras, Ska Keller, Barbara Lochbihler, Ulrike Lunacek, Heidi Hautala, Jordi Sebastià, Bodil Ceballos on behalf of the Greens/EFA Group

The European Parliament,

– having regard to the EU local statement concerning Iguala, issued in agreement with the Heads of Mission of the EU Member States in Mexico, of 12 October 2014,

– having regard to the pronunciations of the Office of the UN High Commission for Human Rights, the Inter American Commission on Human Rights, and of amnesty international ,

– having regard to its resolution on Mexico, of January 2010,

– having regard to the Global Agreement between the EU and Mexico, of 2000,

– having regard to the High Level Dialogue on Human Rights, as part of the Strategic Partnership EU–Mexico, of 2008,

– having regard to the EU Strategic Framework on Human Rights and Democracy, of June 2012

– having regard to Rule 135 of its Rules of Procedure,

A. appalled by the atrocities of September 26, 2014, in the Mexican city of Iguala/Guerrero, when policemen opened the fire on unarmed students from the Ayotzinapa Rural University (Escuela Normal) and shot dead three of the students, a football trainer, a football player and a bus driver, and left around 20 people wounded; deeply shocked that the events resulted in the forced disappearance of 43 students, who are still missing,

B. whereas both the massacre and the forced disappearances happened in the middle of a city at a merely 190 km distance from the capital of Mexico, with two military battalions and an Strategic Operation Centre of the Federal General Prosecutor on the ground; whereas according to eye witnesses members of the local security forces handed over at least 17 of the 43 students to criminal gangs, without any intervention from other security forces; whereas allegedly the students were abducted in police cars and handed over to members of the drug cartel Guerreros Unidos,

C. whereas the Federal Authorities failed to promptly and comprehensively take action in such an outstanding crime and did not start to search for the missing students and adequately protect the survivors and the families without delay, whereas the Federal Authorities only addressed the issue after desperate Ayotzinapa students and relatives of the missing themselves had occupied the Autopista del Sur, more than one week later and after national and international outcry,

D. whereas a week after the abductions, one of the alleged detained perpetrators indicated five mass graves near Iguala on October 3, with 28 carbonised corpses, which might not to be the missing students, according to DNA analysis; whereas more mass graves have been discovered in the area since, whereas the Argentinean Forensics need better conditions to do their necessary work to identify the dead,

E. whereas clear links and cooperation between local authorities and criminal gangs have been revealed in earlier reports by Mexican human rights organisations and have been confirmed by the Mexican secret service CISEN for the case of Iguala, but those reports never led to any official attention and action; whereas this collusion is certainly at the origin of this new crime,

F. whereas this tragedy happens in a context of long standing violence against social movements, political opposition and human rights defenders in Mexico, in particular, but far from exclusively, in Guerrero; whereas the authors of these massacres, state agents or not, benefit from an almost total impunity, which has worked as an incentive to more crime, as is evident in the case of feminicide, or in the recent case of Tlatlaya, state of Mexico, on June 30, 2014, where soldiers killed 22 unarmed persons, of whom at least 19 were executed while kneeing on the ground,

G. whereas at least 11 members of the security forces carried German weapons in a previous police attack against students of the Ayotzinapa University, on December 12, 2011, in Chilpancingo / Guerrero, in which policemen killed two students,

H. whereas the mayor of Iguala, José Luis Abarca, and the head of the local security forces , Felipe Flores, are on want, but have fled; whereas 44 policemen and members of criminal groups are detained meanwhile – 36 of them policemen from Iguala and Cocula/Guerrero,

I. whereas the Office of the Attorney General issued in August 2014 the number of 22.322 persons disappeared since 2006 in Mexico, 44 per cent of which occurred during the current administration, without serious commitment by the Authorities to investigate , prosecute and stop impunity, whereas not a single of these cases has led to court and condemnation at federal level,

J. whereas the recent events in Guerrero represent an unprecedented degree of human rights violations and expose extremely serious issues of impunity, collusion between police officers and organised crime gangs, and excessive use of force and therefore must be addressed within the strategic relations between the EU and Mexico, both the Global Agreement and the Strategic Partnership making use of the existing instruments.

K. Whereas the EU and Mexico are linked by a Global Agreement containing a human rights clause, and a Strategic Partnership, with a clear set of common values, whose violations bears consequences for both the Agreement and the Partnership; whereas with the Strategic Framework on Human Rights and Democracy, of June 2012, the EU pledged to “place human rights at the centre of its relations with all third countries, including its strategic partners” and to throw its “full weight behind advocates of liberty, democracy, and human rights throughout the world”,

L. whereas Mexico has taken many commitments in terms of the protection of human rights at international level, whereas the respect for these commitments is superior to national law; whereas with the current Iguala case, the credibility of the Republic of Mexico as warrant for the respect of human rights is definitively at stake regarding the international community,

1. Expresses its condolences to the families of the six persons shot dead, and its solidarity with the relatives and co-students looking for the 43 missing students, asks the Mexican Authorities to provide full protection to the lives and physical integrity of the surviving students, the relatives and friends of the 43 missing students, and the human rights defenders accompanying the case, further asks the Authorities to provide for psychosocial attention and to effectively implement the precautionary measures assigned to them by the Inter American Commission on Human Rights,

2. Expresses its outmost condemnation of the brutal crime; expects from the Mexican Authorities to do everything possible to find the missing students without further delay and bring them back alive,

3. Equally expects from the Mexican Authorities a full investigation into the 43 forced disappearances and, eventually, extrajudicial killings, the six murders, 20 wounded and other parts of the multiple crime of September 2014 in Iguala, an exhaustive establishment of all responsibilities and the prosecution and effective condemnation of the responsible at all levels, in line with international standards,

4. Stresses that the families of the abducted and killed need to have full access to justice, to be kept fully informed at all stages of the investigation, and that the harm done has to be repaired,

5. Asks for the inclusion of the killing of two Ayotzinapa students, on 12 December 2011, whose cases have come to nothing, due to lacking interest of the authorities, into the prosecution,

6. Welcomes the establishment of committees in the Mexican Congress and Senate to monitor the investigations, and asks to be informed on their respective findings,

7. Asks for a swift investigation into the identity of the 28 corpses, found in five mass graves at the beginning of October, and into the authors of this further abhorrent crime in Iguala, and to carry out equal investigations into at least three further mass graves, and stresses the urgent need to set up a unified, public and accessible national registry of missing and disappeared persons and a DNA data base to identify the thousands of dead bodies found in mass graves in Mexico,

8. Also calls for a full investigation into the circumstances surrounding the attack and abduction, including the repeated failure of state and federal authorities to investigate frequent reports on collusion between local and public officials and criminal gangs,

9. Calls the office of the prosecutor of the ICC to pay particular attention to the massacres and force disappearances committed in Mexico and in case it considers them to be within its jurisdiction request the Office of the Prosecutor to open an investigation on those crimes,

10. Underlines the urgent need to effectively dismantle all cooperation structures between authorities and organised crimes,

11. Firmly asks the EU and the Member States to monitor, within the High Level Dialogue on Human Rights and other fora, the clarification of the crime until all material and intellectual perpetrators are punished, and the criminal structures dismantled, and to urgently offer protection measures to civil society and particular members of human rights organisations under threat in Guerrero,

12. Stresses that, if solved in court, the Iguala case must not be a one off; reminds the Mexican Authorities of the broader context of the murder case of Finnish citizen Jyri Jaakola and Mexican citizen Bety Cariño, killed near San José Copala in Oaxaca on April 27, 2010, while further 20 Mexican and European citizens were wounded; and reiterates the need to finally ensure witness protection, execute arrest warrants, proceed to trial and ensure due punishment of the responsible of the murder,

13. Asks all EU member states to suspend or withhold from any negotiation of security agreements between them and Mexico, among them Germany, and to declare Mexico a no go area for arms cooperation, as long as the rule of law is not re-established in the whole of the Mexican territory and organised crime is under control and dismantled,

14. Asks the Commission to demand from the Member States precise information on their past and present arms cooperation with Mexico so as to trace and confiscate European arms in the hands of organised crime,

15. Is of the opinion that the foreseen modernization of the Global Agreement between the EU and Mexico should be put on hold, its chapters and aims be revised, all possible loopholes for a spill over of organised crime influence, not at least in the financial services sector, be detected, and that the way how to shield trade rules from criminal abuse should be intensely discussed with experts, the European and Mexican Parliament and civil society, while a closer cooperation of human rights issues, including binding enforcement mechanisms, are developed, before any other steps are taken,

16. Instructs its President to forward this resolution to the Commission, EEAS and the Council, the Government of the Member States, the Republic of Mexico, the Organisation of American States and the Office of the UN High Commissioner on Human Rights in Mexico.

 

European Parliament

Choisissez la langue de votre document

Document stages in plenary
Document selected : B8-0175/2014

Texts tabled :

B8-0175/2014

Debates :

PV 23/10/2014 – 6.3
CRE 23/10/2014 – 6.3

Votes :

PV 23/10/2014 – 7.3
CRE 23/10/2014 – 7.3

Texts adopted :

MOTION FOR A RESOLUTION
PDF 152k DOC 61k
See also joint motion for a resolution RC-B8-0167/2014
21.10.2014
PE537.078v01-00
B8-0175/2014
with request for inclusion in the agenda for a debate on cases of breaches of human rights, democracy and the rule of law

 

pursuant to Rule 135 of the Rules of Procedure
on the abduction of 43 students in Guerrero/Mexico (2014/2905(RSP))
Ernest Urtasun, Josep-Maria Terricabras, Ska Keller, Barbara Lochbihler, Ulrike Lunacek, Heidi Hautala, Jordi Sebastià, Fabio Massimo Castaldo, Ignazio Corrao, Bodil Ceballos on behalf of the Verts/ALE GroupNB: This motion for a resolution is available in the original language only.

European Parliament resolution on the abduction of 43 students in Guerrero/Mexico (2014/2905(RSP))
B8‑0175/2014
The European Parliament,

–          having regard to the EU local statement concerning Iguala, issued in agreement with the Heads of Mission of the EU Member States in Mexico, of 12 October 2014,

–          having regard to the pronunciations of the Office of the UN High Commission for Human Rights, the Inter American Commission on Human Rights, and of amnesty international ,

–          having regard to its resolution on Mexico, of January 2010,

–          having regard to the Global Agreement between the EU and Mexico, of 2000,

–          having regard to the High Level Dialogue on Human Rights, as part of the Strategic Partnership EU–Mexico, of 2008,

–          having regard to the EU Strategic Framework on Human Rights and Democracy, of June 2012

–          having regard to Rule 135 of its Rules of Procedure,

 

A.           appalled by the atrocities of September 26, 2014, in the Mexican city of Iguala/Guerrero, when policemen opened the fire on unarmed students from the Ayotzinapa Rural University (Escuela Normal) and shot dead three of the students, a football trainer, a football player and a bus driver, and left around 20 people wounded; deeply shocked that the events resulted in the forced disappearance of 43 students, who are still missing,

 

B.           whereas both the massacre and the forced disappearances happened in the middle of a city at a merely 190 km distance from the capital of Mexico, with two military battalions and an Strategic Operation Centre of the Federal General Prosecutor on the ground; whereas according to eye witnesses members of the local security forces handed over at least 17 of the 43 students to criminal gangs, without any intervention from other security forces; whereas allegedly the students were abducted in police cars and handed over to members of the drug cartel Guerreros Unidos,

 

C.           whereas the Federal Authorities failed to promptly and comprehensively take action in such an outstanding crime and did not start to search for the missing students and adequately protect the survivors and the families without delay, whereas the Federal Authorities only addressed the issue after desperate Ayotzinapa students and relatives of the missing themselves had occupied the Autopista del Sur, more than one week later and after national and international outcry,

 

D.           whereas a week after the abductions, one of the alleged detained perpetrators indicated five mass graves near Iguala on October 3, with 28 carbonised corpses, which might not to be the missing students, according to DNA analysis; whereas more mass graves have been discovered in the area since, whereas the Argentinean Forensics need better conditions to do their necessary work to identify the dead,

 

E.           whereas clear links and cooperation between local authorities and criminal gangs have been revealed in earlier reports by Mexican human rights organisations and have been confirmed by the Mexican secret service CISEN for the case of Iguala, but those reports never led to any official attention and action; whereas this collusion is certainly at the origin of this new crime,

F.           whereas this tragedy happens in a context of long standing violence against social movements, political opposition and human rights defenders in Mexico, in particular, but far from exclusively, in Guerrero; whereas the authors of these massacres, state agents or not, benefit from an almost total impunity, which has worked as an incentive to more crime, as is evident in the case of feminicide, or in the recent case of Tlatlaya, state of Mexico, on June 30, 2014, where soldiers killed 22 unarmed persons, of whom at least 19 were executed while kneeing on the ground,

 

G.           whereas at least 11 members of the security forces carried German weapons in a previous police attack against students of the Ayotzinapa University, on December 12, 2011, in Chilpancingo / Guerrero, in which policemen killed two students,

 

H.           whereas the mayor of Iguala, José Luis Abarca, and the head of the local security forces , Felipe Flores, are on want, but have fled; whereas 44 policemen and members of criminal groups are detained meanwhile – 36 of them policemen from Iguala and Cocula/Guerrero,

I.            whereas the Office of the Attorney General issued in August 2014 the number of 22.322 persons disappeared since 2006 in Mexico, 44 per cent of which occurred during the current administration, without serious commitment by the Authorities to investigate , prosecute and stop impunity, whereas not a single of these cases has led to court and condemnation at federal level,

 

J.            whereas the recent events in Guerrero represent an unprecedented degree of human rights violations and expose extremely serious issues of impunity, collusion between police officers and organised crime gangs, and excessive use of force and therefore must be addressed within the strategic relations between the EU and Mexico, both the Global Agreement and the Strategic Partnership making use of the existing instruments.

 

K.           Whereas the EU and Mexico are linked by a Global Agreement containing a human rights clause, and a Strategic Partnership, with a clear set of common values, whose violations bears consequences for both the Agreement and the Partnership; whereas with the Strategic Framework on Human Rights and Democracy, of June 2012, the EU pledged to “place human rights at the centre of its relations with all third countries, including its strategic partners” and to throw its “full weight behind advocates of liberty, democracy, and human rights throughout the world”,

 

L.            whereas Mexico has taken many commitments in terms of the protection of human rights at international level, whereas the respect for these commitments is superior to national law; whereas with the current Iguala case, the credibility of the Republic of Mexico as warrant for the respect of human rights is definitively at stake regarding the international community,

 

1.           Expresses its condolences to the families of the six persons shot dead, and its solidarity with the relatives and co-students looking for the 43 missing students, asks the Mexican Authorities to provide full protection to the lives and physical integrity of the surviving students, the relatives and friends of the 43 missing students, and the human rights defenders accompanying the case, further asks the Authorities to provide for psychosocial attention and to effectively implement the precautionary measures assigned to them by the Inter American Commission on Human Rights,

 

2.           Expresses its outmost condemnation of the brutal crime; expects from the Mexican Authorities to do everything possible to find the missing students without further delay and bring them back alive,

 

3.           Equally expects from the Mexican Authorities a full investigation into the 43 forced disappearances and, eventually, extrajudicial killings, the six murders, 20 wounded and other parts of the multiple crime of September 2014 in Iguala, an exhaustive establishment of all responsibilities and the prosecution and effective condemnation of the responsible at all levels, in line with international standards,

 

4.           Stresses that the families of the abducted and killed need to have full access to justice, to be kept fully informed at all stages of the investigation, and that the harm done has to be repaired,

 

5.           Asks for the inclusion of the killing of two Ayotzinapa students, on 12 December 2011, whose cases have come to nothing, due to lacking interest of the authorities, into the prosecution,

 

6.           Welcomes the establishment of committees in the Mexican Congress and Senate to monitor the investigations, and asks to be informed on their respective findings,

 

7.           Asks for a swift investigation into the identity of the 28 corpses, found in five mass graves at the beginning of October, and into the authors of this further abhorrent crime in Iguala, and to carry out equal investigations into at least three further mass graves, and stresses the urgent need to set up a unified, public and accessible national registry of missing and disappeared persons and a DNA data base to identify the thousands of dead bodies found in mass graves in Mexico,

 

8.           Also calls for a full investigation into the circumstances surrounding the attack and abduction, including the repeated failure of state and federal authorities to investigate frequent reports on collusion between local and public officials and criminal gangs,

 

9.           Calls the office of the prosecutor of the ICC to pay particular attention to the massacres and force disappearances committed in Mexico and in case it considers them to be within its jurisdiction request the Office of the Prosecutor to open an investigation on those crimes,

 

10.         Underlines the urgent need to effectively dismantle all cooperation structures between authorities and organised crimes,

 

11.         Firmly asks the EU and the Member States to monitor, within the High Level Dialogue on Human Rights and other fora, the clarification of the crime until all material and intellectual perpetrators are punished, and the criminal structures dismantled, and to urgently offer protection measures to civil society and particular members of human rights organisations under threat in Guerrero,

 

12.         Stresses that, if solved in court, the Iguala case must not be a one off; reminds the Mexican Authorities of the broader context of the murder case of Finnish citizen Jyri Jaakola and Mexican citizen Bety Cariño, killed near San José Copala in Oaxaca on April 27, 2010, while further 20 Mexican and European citizens were wounded; and reiterates the need to finally ensure witness protection, execute arrest warrants, proceed to trial and ensure due punishment of the responsible of the murder,

 

13.         Asks all EU member states to suspend or withhold from any negotiation of security agreements between them and Mexico, among them Germany, and to declare Mexico a no go area for arms cooperation, as long as the rule of law is not re-established in the whole of the Mexican territory and organised crime is under control and dismantled,

 

14.         Asks the Commission to demand from the Member States precise information on their past and present arms cooperation with Mexico so as to trace and confiscate European arms in the hands of organised crime,

 

15.         Is of the opinion that the foreseen modernization of the Global Agreement between the EU and Mexico should be put on hold, its chapters and aims be revised, all possible loopholes for a spill over of organised crime influence, not at least in the financial services sector, be detected, and that the way how to shield trade rules from criminal abuse should be intensely discussed with experts, the European and Mexican Parliament and civil society, while a closer cooperation of human rights issues, including binding enforcement mechanisms, are developed, before any other steps are taken,

 

16.      Instructs its President to forward this resolution to the Commission, EEAS and the Council, the Government of the Member States, the Republic of Mexico, the Organisation of American States and the Office of the UN High Commissioner on Human Rights in Mexico.

Your,

Pano

PS:

We shall continue to advance our cause for Democracy against Corruption through regular meetings in Europe and the Americas and hope that you shall participate in one of our upcoming Town Hall meetings.


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